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American newspapers comment on Biden's speech to Congress: He presents himself as a leader of the Americans


US President Joe Biden's speech to Congress, delivered at dawn Thursday, captured the attention of American newspapers, as the Washington Post said that Biden renewed focus during the speech on a set of priorities, including changes in immigration policy, arms control, police reform, and US images on It is rapidly emerging from the depths of the global Corona crisis, and has survived events that, in his view, were a possibly unprecedented test of American democracy.


The Washington Post said that Biden renewed during the speech focus on a set of priorities that paralyze changes in immigration policy, arms control and police reform, and portrayed the United States as rapidly emerging from the depths of the global Corona crisis, and survived events that, in his view, were a test that may have been unprecedented before. For American democracy.


The newspaper added that Biden used the rhetoric to present himself as a leader who wanted to bring a host of benefits to ordinary Americans, from green jobs to caring for the elderly, and his message was intended to resonate with both the populist movement and the political class.



Biden began his speech by saying: I took the oath, raised my hand on our family’s gospel, and inherited a nation in crisis, the worst pandemic in a century, the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, and the worst attack on our democracy since the Civil War. And now, after only 100 days, I can tell the nation that America is moving again, the danger has turned into a possibility, the crisis is an opportunity, and the setback becomes strength.



For its part, the New York Times said, Biden has set an ambitious agenda to rewrite the American social contract by dramatically expanding family vacations, childcare, healthcare, and pre-school and university education for millions of people, financed by tax increases for the richest.


Biden cited Roosevelt's legacy and unveiled a $ 1.8 trillion social spending plan to build roads and bridges, expand other social programs and combat climate change, representing a fundamental reorientation of the government's role unprecedented since the "Roosevelt New Deal."

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